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Film Screening: "Traces of the Trade"

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Film Screening: "Traces of the Trade"

College of Arts and Humanities | History | The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center Monday, February 20, 2012 7:00 pm-9:00 pm The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, Leah M. Smith Hall,

In this feature documentary, filmmaker Katrina Browne discovers that her New England ancestors, the DeWolfes, were the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history.
Browne and nine cousins retrace the Triangle Trade in a remarkable journey that brings them face-to-face with the history and legacy of New England's hidden enterprise.

The issues they confront dramatize questions that apply to the nation as a whole:

What, concretely, is the legacy of slavery - for diverse whites, for diverse blacks, for diverse others? Who owes who what for the sins of the fathers of this country? What history do we inherit as individuals and as citizens? And what would repair - spiritual and material - really look like?

The film will be preceded by remarks from UMD history professor Richard Bell.

Professor Bell is currently at work upon a new book-length study of a female Marylander who kidnapped free black people and sold them into slavery in Mississippi in the 1810s and 1820s. The project is titled "The Blackest Market: Patty Cannon and the Domestic Slavery Trade."

Add to Calendar 02/20/12 7:00 PM 02/20/12 9:00 PM America/New_York Film Screening: "Traces of the Trade"

In this feature documentary, filmmaker Katrina Browne discovers that her New England ancestors, the DeWolfes, were the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history.
Browne and nine cousins retrace the Triangle Trade in a remarkable journey that brings them face-to-face with the history and legacy of New England's hidden enterprise.

The issues they confront dramatize questions that apply to the nation as a whole:

What, concretely, is the legacy of slavery - for diverse whites, for diverse blacks, for diverse others? Who owes who what for the sins of the fathers of this country? What history do we inherit as individuals and as citizens? And what would repair - spiritual and material - really look like?

The film will be preceded by remarks from UMD history professor Richard Bell.

Professor Bell is currently at work upon a new book-length study of a female Marylander who kidnapped free black people and sold them into slavery in Mississippi in the 1810s and 1820s. The project is titled "The Blackest Market: Patty Cannon and the Domestic Slavery Trade."

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center