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Research

The Department of History at the University of Maryland is located within the Washington-Baltimore corridor, one of the nation's most dynamic regions for historical research.

Faculty and graduate students pursue research in numerous fields of study, and the department regularly hosts conferences.

The intellectual "soul" of historical inquiry and debate at the University of Maryland is the Nathan and Jeanette Miller Center for Historical Studies, established in 1999 through the generosity of Maryland alumni Nathan and Jeanette Miller. 

Established in 2011, the Center for Global Migration Studies is an interdisciplinary home for the study of migration and immigration around the world both today and in the past. The center provides a distinctive institutional home for interdisciplinary research, for training faculty and students, and for distributing information about the migrant experience to a broad public. 

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The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Kazakhstan

Learn about Sarah Cameron’s book "The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Kazakhstan."

History

Author/Lead: Sarah Cameron
Dates:

Sarah Cameron’s book, "The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence, and the Making of Kazakhstan" uses new Russian and Kazakh language sources to tell the story of one of the most abominable crimes of the Stalin years—and one that’s gone largely untold. Between 1930 and 1933, more than 1.5 million people—a quarter of Kazakhstan's population—perished as a result of a state-driven campaign that forced a rural, nomadic population into collective farms and factories and confiscated their livestock. Although elements of nomadic culture continued to influence Kazakh life in the post-famine years, the effort effectively eradicated nomadism as an economic practice. 

Remaking the Republic: Black Politics and the Creation of American Citizenship

Learn about Christopher Bonner's book "Remaking the Republic: Black Politics and the Creation of American Citizenship."

History

Author/Lead: Christopher Bonner
Dates:

Christopher Bonner's book "Remaking the Republic: Black Politics and the Creation of American Citizenship" chronicles the various ways African Americans from a wide range of social positions throughout the North attempted to give meaning to American citizenship over the course of the nineteenth century. 

Enslaved.org: Peoples of the Historic Slave Trade

Learn about the website, Enslaved.org: Peoples of the Historic Slave Trade.

History

Dates:

Enslaved.org: Peoples of the Historic Slave Trade is an online database compiling records of over 600,000 people who were enslaved, owned slaves or participated in the historical trade. The database was created in partnership with Matrix: MSU Center for Digital Humanities & Social Sciences, MSU Department of History, UMD College of Arts and Humanities, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and scholars at multiple institutions of education, research, and public exhibition.

image from new digital database Enslaved.org

Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home

Learn about Richard Bell's book "Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home."

History

Author/Lead: Richard Bell
Dates:

Richard Bell's book, "Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped Into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home" tells the gripping and true story about five boys who were kidnapped in the North and smuggled into slavery in the Deep South—and their daring attempt to escape and bring their captors to justice.

Freedom Incorporated: Anticommunism And Philippine Independence In The Age Of Decolonization

Learn about Colleen Woods' book, "Freedom Incorporated: Anticommunism And Philippine Independence In The Age Of Decolonization."

History

Author/Lead: Colleen Woods
Dates:

Colleen Woods' book "Freedom Incorporated: Anticommunism And Philippine Independence In The Age Of Decolonization" demonstrates how anticommunist political projects were critical to the United States' expanding imperial power in the age of decolonization, and how anticommunism was essential to the growing global economy of imperial violence in the Cold War era. 

Unit Activity-Service test

Unit Activity-Service test

Communication

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Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote exhibit

Robyn Muncy guest curates exhibit at the National Archives to commemorate the centenary of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.

History

Dates: -
Rightfully Hers Promo
Robyn Muncy, professor of history, guest curated an exhibit at the National Archives marking the 100th anniversary of women in the U.S. attaining the right to vote.

Robyn Muncy, professor of history, is a guest curator of "Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote," an exhibit to commemorate the centenary of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment at the National Archives in Washington, DC. The exhibit opened in March and will run through September 2020. 

The exhibition is part of a nationwide initiative exploring the generations-long fight for universal woman suffrage. Despite decades of marches, petitions, and public debate to enshrine a woman’s right to vote in the Constitution, the 19th Amendment – while an enormous milestone – did not grant voting rights for all. The challenges of its passage reverberate to the ongoing fight for gender equity today. 

What is now considered a key component of citizenship - the right to vote - is often taken for granted, and is not afforded to all through the Constitution. Through this initiative, the National Archives will not only highlight the hard-won victories that stemmed from the Women’s Suffrage movement, but also remind modern-day citizens of their responsibilities associated with the right to vote.

Read more about the exhibition on the National Archives website.